How Long Do You Plan To Live In Your Current Home?

If you are like the majority of Canadians over the age of 45, you want to continue living in a familiar environment throughout your maturing years. According to AARP, older homeowners overwhelmingly prefer to age-in-place, which means living in your home safely, independently and comfortably, regardless of age or ability level.

 

How Should You Modify Your Home To Make It More Comfortable?

To age-in-place, you will probably need to modify your house as you get older to increase access and maneuverability. These modifications range from installing bath and shower balance bars, railings and ramps to adjusting countertop heights as well as creating multifunctional master suites.

 

Who Can You Rely On To Modify Your Home?

 

A Certified Aging-In-Place Specialist (CAPS) has been trained in:

The unique needs of the older adult population Aging-In-Place home modifications

Typical remodelling projects and solutions to common barriers

 

Is Your Home Ready?

Here’s A Checklist To Help You Decide On What Modifications Are Needed In Your Home.

Click Here

Veronica Rita Vescio-Wrigley is a Certified Aging In Place Specialist living in Simcoe County.  As a baby-boomer, Veronica recognizes the importance of accessibility in the home.

Simcoe County and surrounding areas are the largest maturing population in all of Canada and will continue to grow as baby-boomers retire, calling this area “home”.

Certified “Aging In Place” Specialists assist individuals in assessing the current home in terms of safety, the ability to live independently and comfortably regardless of age, income or ability levels. These specialists also work with individuals to research ideas and resources needed to design and build/modify barrier-free living environments. An initial assessment would include but not limited to such items as:

Individuals with no restrictions and/or who are not experiencing health issues related to aging, individuals who have a progressive or other condition that requires home modifications or equipment or individuals who are dealing with an abrupt or traumatic health-related change.

Many people are familiar with the terms “Aging In Place” or “Universal Design”. However,  “visitability” may be a newer concept.

Essentially, “visitability” allows guests or occupants entering the home for any purpose to be able to gain access and move within it easily. In what conditions are the sidewalks, walkways, driveway surfaces, porches, front door, entry doors and access to the garage from inside the home?

Are handrails or ramps needed? Are house numbers visible at night from the street? Certified “Aging In Place” Specialists look at the condition of floors, thresholds and hallways.  Are they level,  wide enough and clear of clutter?

Are there any area rugs or trip hazards?

They also assess the bathroom amenities; is the sink basin and tub safely accessible?  Are they equipped with necessary safety features such as grab bars including and/or railings tub/shower support?

Kitchen, living and bedrooms areas are also areas assessed for appropriate lighting for tasks to be completed. Electrical outlets moved at a comfortable height for safety.

Are levels of work services, appliances, shelving and storage accessible at work levels that are adequate? Ensure there is easy access to a home phone or cell phone for a call for help. Egress is also an important consideration for an emergency exit.

 

Certified “Aging In Place” Specialists assist individuals in assessing the current home in terms of safety, the ability to live independently and comfortably regardless of age, income or ability levels. These specialists also work with individuals to research ideas and resources needed to design and build/modify barrier-free living environments. An initial assessment would include but not limited to such items as:

Individuals with no restrictions and/or who are not experiencing health issues related to aging, individuals who have a progressive or other condition that requires home modifications or equipment or individuals who are dealing with an abrupt or traumatic health-related change.

Many people are familiar with the terms “Aging In Place” or “Universal Design”. However,  “visitability” may be a newer concept.

Essentially, “visitability” allows guests or occupants entering the home for any purpose to be able to gain access and move within it easily. In what conditions are the sidewalks, walkways, driveway surfaces, porches, front door, entry doors and access to the garage from inside the home?

Are handrails or ramps needed? Are house numbers visible at night from the street? Certified “Aging In Place” Specialists look at the condition of floors, thresholds and hallways.  Are they level,  wide enough and clear of clutter?

Are there any area rugs or trip hazards?

They also assess the bathroom amenities; is the sink basin and tub safely accessible?  Are they equipped with necessary safety features such as grab bars including and/or railings tub/shower support?

Kitchen, living and bedrooms areas are also areas assessed for appropriate lighting for tasks to be completed. Electrical outlets moved at a comfortable height for safety.

Are levels of work services, appliances, shelving and storage accessible at work levels that are adequate? Ensure there is easy access to a home phone or cell phone for a call for help. Egress is also an important consideration for an emergency exit.